Audio Preservation Engineer, Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project (Norfolk)

 

The Norfolk Record Office is looking for an Audio Preservation Engineer as part of its role as a regional hub of the Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project. Unlocking Our Sound Heritage is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and is led by the British Library in conjunction with 10 national and regional partners across the UK. Unlocking Our Sound Heritage will digitally preserve almost half a million endangered sound recordings from across the UK and make 100,000 available online, transforming the visibility of sound archive collections in the process.

The Norfolk Record Office is the hub for the East of England. Over three years, it will digitise 5,000 physical sound items, from its own collections, and from other collections in the East of England. The digitised material will then be used as part of innovative learning and outreach activities. The Norfolk Record Office is one of 10 hubs recruiting project staff in Aberystwyth, Belfast, Brighton, Bristol, Glasgow, London, Leicester, Manchester, Newcastle and Norwich during Spring/Summer 2018.

You will produce archival quality digital transfers of audio material to international standards, with associated metadata. They will create audio files and associated technical metadata for preservation and access, from a range of current and legacy original formats. Applicants must have an enthusiasm for recorded sound combined with an interest in audio recording, playback and transfer technologies.

For an informal discussion regarding this vacancy please contact Jonathan Draper on 01603 222692.

Post Duration: 36 months

Post hours per week: 37

Post Salary: £23,866 – £25,463

Post Start Date: 2018/10/15

Post Application Closing Date: 2018/08/21

Click here for further details about the post and how to apply.


Cataloguing Manager, Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project (Norfolk)

 

The Norfolk Record Office is looking for a Cataloguing Manager as part of its role as a regional hub of the Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project. Unlocking Our Sound Heritage is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and is led by the British Library in conjunction with 10 national and regional partners across the UK. Unlocking Our Sound Heritage will digitally preserve almost half a million endangered sound recordings from across the UK and make 100,000 available online, transforming the visibility of sound archive collections in the process.

The Norfolk Record Office is the hub for the East of England. Over three years, it will digitise 5,000 physical sound items, from its own collections, and from other collections in the East of England. The digitised material will then be used as part of innovative learning and outreach activities. The Norfolk Record Office is one of 10 hubs recruiting project staff in Aberystwyth, Belfast, Brighton, Bristol, Glasgow, London, Leicester, Manchester, Newcastle and Norwich during Spring/Summer 2018.

You will enable people to find and access digitised sound recordings. They will create and amend catalogue records and other metadata and have experience of cataloguing in a library, archive, museum or other similar environment.

For an informal discussion regarding this vacancy please contact Jonathan Draper on 01603 222692.

Post Location: Norwich, Norfolk
Post Duration: 36 months
PostHours per week: 37
PostSalary: £23,866 – £25,463
Post Start Date: 2018/10/15
Post Application Closing Date: 2018/08/21

Click here for further details about the post and how to apply.

 


OHS at 50 survey – tell us which OHJ articles have influenced you

 

In 2019, the Oral History Journal will turn 50 years old and we are marking the occasion with fiftieth anniversary celebratory events for the Oral History Society as a whole to include:

  • A celebratory event and anniversary party
  • The launch of a new Oral History Society archive at the British Library
  • Online edited audio highlights from the ‘Oral History of Oral History’ project, featuring pioneers and practitioners of UK oral history over 50 years
  • And a special online edition of ‘Oral History’: it’s this I’m contacting you about now.

Oral History Journal is seeking nominations of the most important and influential articles the Journal has published in the last fifty years.

This is your chance to let us know which articles from the OHJ have influenced you and your approaches to oral history. Which have inspired you? Which have challenged you? Which are your favourites? Which do your recommend to others (and why?).

Here’s an online survey. It only takes a few minutes: https://bournemouth.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/ohj50.

We’ll publish the best responses and the authors of these will be invited to the anniversary party! Keep an eye out for more details of the special events for OHS@50.

Thank you.

On behalf of the Oral History Journal

http://www.ohs.org.uk/journal/


Oral History and Data Protection

 

The Oral History Society has recently published Data Protection advice and guidelines for oral historians and organisations holding oral history interviews. It can be found here: http://www.ohs.org.uk/advice/data-protection/

In response to GDPR, the Society has also updated its Privacy and Data Storage Policy with information to clarify how it collects, stores and uses personal data. You can read the new Privacy Notice here:  http://www.ohs.org.uk/about/privacy/


Oral History Co-ordinator, Canari Project (Blackwood, Caerphilly)

 

Volunteer Duties

– Are you looking for a heritage project to develop your creative audio skills?

– Are you interested in gaining experience in co-ordinating the work of volunteers?

– Are you passionate about creating platforms for unheard voices and perspectives?

The Canari Project is looking for an Oral History Co-ordinator interested in organising a team to gather oral histories, working with our disabled participants and volunteers to record contributions from ex-miners and others across the Caerphilly valley and surrounding boroughs.

The role includes organising volunteers, contacting contributors, arranging and recording interviews and cataloguing audio (editing and crafting sound-pieces can be incorporated in the role too if you are interested). Training and support will be provided. We’re a small team and all work together, aiming to maximise the positive outcomes for all our participants.

Who we are

The Canari project is an exciting community history venture that is looking at the history of disability in local heavy industries from 1850 to the present day. Most importantly, the project aims to use the insight of our volunteers and participants in their own experiences of disability to see how the challenges have shaped and changed our community. We are a Heritage Lottery Funded project run by the charity Disability Can Do.

You will be helping to support a team of disabled people who are working with archives and local heritage centres to uncover the experiences of disabled people in industry. We are doing this by gathering archived documents and photographs, traditional songs, poetry and personal stories. These personal stories – oral histories – are a vital element. Our participants will have the chance to use the material gathered in creative workshops to produce digital stories to present their findings. The finished results will be shared through a pop-up exhibition, school presentations, on-line digital stories and at community events.

Our participants have received basic training in gathering oral histories from People’s Collection Wales, Our links with ex-miner groups, Swansea University, and other contacts mean we are building a list of contributors to interview. All we need now is a dedicated volunteer to assist in co-ordinating the process of setting up and managing an exciting schedule of recordings!

The Role on Offer

The main focus for this role will be running the oral history project by co-ordinating our volunteers, contacting contributors and organising recording sessions. We can offer training and advice on oral history, provided by People’s Collection Wales, as well as support and training in working with volunteers. This role offers a real opportunity to take part in an important project uncovering an overlooked past.

Experience/Qualifications/Attributes

– You should have a lively interest in people and enjoy helping groups to work together.

– You need an interest in history and particularly oral history, storytelling and narrative.

– No formal qualifications are required and this opportunity is open to all experience levels, (though any previous audio recording and/or editing skills would be much appreciated).

– You will need to have a suitable grasp of English language. Welsh language skills are always an asset however most interviews will be conducted in English.

Time Commitment

Minimum 7 hours per week. This can be a mixture of in the office/at home or on visits. This role will extend through the summer period until September. The role is offered on an unpaid voluntary basis.

How to apply

If you are interested in becoming involved, get in touch by telephoning Disability Can Do on 01495 233555 or email Eleanor.Hill@disabilitycando.org.uk    

Write a covering email explaining your previous experience and why you’re interested in working with us (you can send a CV if you like) but please feel free to ring up for a chat first. It would be very useful if you could tell us the days and times you are generally available.

Out of pocket expenses that can be paid

Lunch and travel expenses will be paid for off-site visits. Subsistence up to £5 a day can be claimed back as well as expenses for travel to the office.

Training offered

This opportunity will involve:

– Training in oral history techniques, methods, ethics

– Training in logging and cataloguing recordings

– Developing your historical research and media production skills

 

 


WWII Front line Kent Childhoods (Folkstone, Hythe, Margate, Ramsgate)

 

Organisation: Pavement Pounders Community Interest Company
http://www.pavementpounders.co.uk

Volunteer Duties: We are seeking two young adults aged 18-25 from each of the seaside towns of Folkestone, Hythe (Kent), Margate and Ramsgate to assist with oral history interviews and filming in early 2019 after having attended our training workshops (see Volunteering Training Opportunities box below).

A brief description of the project:
WWII Front-Line Kent Childhoods A Pavement Pounders CIC Project

Life for young people in Kent seaside towns under fire, during WWII. The towns chosen are Folkestone, Hythe, Margate and Ramsgate. Prompted by being sent unsolicited audio files made by locals about childhood encounters with V1 rockets in Folkestone when the current TV news was full of reports of the suffering of children in Syria. The accounts we were sent highlighted the contrast between the towns’ pre- and post-war role as holiday destinations welcoming visitors with their wartime role as restricted areas repelling attack. With the help of local young people we shall gather the memories of those who lived their childhood years in these seaside towns during WWII experiencing the attacks from across the channel. We are a community interest company based in Folkestone on the Kent coast. We devise and manage heritage and arts projects.

This project is supported by Kent County Council and the Big Lottery

Training Opportunities: We offer young adults aged 18-25 two training workshops which shall be held in Folkestone and or Ramsgate depending on take up. One on oral history interviewing techniques, the other on using video for heritage projects. The workshops will take place between September and December 2018.

Expenses: We shall pay reasonable pre-agreed travel expenses.

Closing Date of Project: May 2019


Rainbow Pilgrims – Preparing LGBTQI collections for deposit (London)

 

Archive Skills – Preparing LGBTQI collections for deposit – looking for volunteers – Training provided!

Organisation: Rainbow Pilgrims: The Rites and Passages of LGBTQI Migrants in the UK Project
Address: The Montagu Centre, 21 Maple St, London, W1T 4BE

Webpage: https://www.rainbowpilgrims.com/event/archiveskills/

Volunteer Duties: You will be expected to hone your (new) skills and help with Rainbow Pilgrims archival work (eg cataloguing, preparing collection for deposit); minimum amount of volunteering hours 1.5/week for 4-8 weeks from 14 May 2018 onwards at the LMA and other London (office at W1T 4BE) or PC-home based locations. You may be invited to work also on finalising the deposit of our other two collections Rainbow Jews and Twilight People, as the collections are connected.

This is a fantastic hands-on skills exchange opportunity, and a great opportunity to network and gain skills from senior archivists and be part of a landmark oral history project.

Location: The London Metropolitan Archives

Training Opportunities: Free Training/Induction for volunteers will be provided on 12 May 2018, 11-4pm, at the London Metropolitan Archives.

Training content: introduction to archives & exploring LGBTQ records to gain a general understanding of archives and their importance to learn about record types normally encountered through original examples, to gain an understanding of potential issues concerning use of original documents and recordings including ownership and copyright, to gain knowledge of key fundamental archival principles and ethics, to know how to advise private individuals if they have records and want to know more about how to care for them, to learn about how to care for and organise your collections.

Expenses: Reasonable travel expenses

Lunch packs (full day £10)

Archive materials expenses reimbursed

Closing Date of Project: 30 June 2018


Resorting to the Coast (Clacton-on-Sea/National)

Resorting to the Coast is a wonderful Heritage Lottery Funded project to promote the colourful seaside resorts of the Tendring coast in Essex.

We are seeking tenacious and proactive volunteers for two styles of roles which play a crucial and valuable part in making our oral history interviews accessible to the wider public:
– Sound editors
– Typing/producing oral history interview summaries

Ideally you will already have experience in these fields but if you are a fresh beginner – we can provide training if you’ve not done this before and you’ll need to be able to travel to Tendring or London.

About the project:
Resorting to the Coast has several different activities to engage with the public including oral history interviewing, seaside entertainments, a school programme, a travelling exhibition of coastal curiosities, two conferences, heritage walking trails, an online compendium of Tendring’s seaside heritage plus more!

Tendring’s coastal resorts played a key role in the establishment of the nostalgic ‘British Seaside Holiday’ since they became popular in the late Victorian era.

Location of position: Home based with own laptop/PC
Training Opportunities: We can provide technical training for editing oral history recordings and guidance on how to produce interview summaries.
Expenses: We can reimburse reasonable travel expenses if required and out of pocket expenses incurred by volunteers for attending training sessions.

Further information for Resorting to the Coast and details of how to apply to volunteer can be found here:  https://www.tendringcoastalheritage.org.uk/

Closing Date of Project: 31st July 2019

For more information, please contact Juliana Vandegrift:  juliana.vandegrift@essex.gov.uk

Organisation: Essex County Council, Town Hall, Station Road, Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, CO15 1SE 

​Twitter handle is @RTTC and #ResortingtotheCoast

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/resortingtothecoast/?modal=admin_todo_tour


“The ‘Discovery’ of India in the long 1960s”: A Study of Transnational Youth Cultures in Western Europe, the United States and India

 

Taking up the historico-cultural thesis of value change and the “life-style revolution” in the long 1960s, this research project will explore the cultural effects of travel and temporary migration to India among the youth of the 1960s and 1970s and its effects on popular culture (i.e. music, nutrition styles, body cultures, alternative tourism, fashion, the transformation of religion in everyday life).

The project links the history of transnational youth culture, oral history, and research on self-narratives and relates them to autobiographical memory and the impact of traveling and migration on youth cultures. It is intended to contribute to the cultural history of the 1960s and 1970s, the history of tourism and migration, and the transformation of religion in contemporary history.

Did you travel to India in the 1960s and 1970s?

The project is seeking witnesses in the UK who traveled to India in the 1960s and 1970s who are willing to take part in an oral history interview. The interviews usually take 30-45 minutes. Skype and FaceTime interviews are possible but I will also be traveling in the UK in June/July 2018 and could meet interviewees in person. If you are willing to share your experience, know of someone who might be interested in talking to me, or would like more information, please contact me at: isabel.richter@berkeley.edu

Isabel Richter
DAAD Professor
University of California Berkeley
Department of History
3229 Dwinelle Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720

 

 


‘Hidden Histories’: The Beaford Archive

 

The Beaford Archive is a photographic record of people and community in rural north Devon containing more than 80,000 images covering the 120-year period 1870 to 1990.  According to the Royal Photographic Society, it is “…a unique body of work, unparalleled, at least in this country, for its scale and quality”.  However, few of these images are currently accessible to the public.

Hidden Histories is a three-year project and will include:
•        Digitising, cataloguing, archiving and publishing to the web approximately 10,000 existing 35mm black and white negatives from the James Ravilious and Roger Deakins Beaford Archives
•        Production of a new fully searchable website to provide a showcase for existing digitised work, newly digitised images and audio, and new work as it is produced
•        A programme of oral history, learning and community activity which will create new work and engage people in learning and education

Duration 14 (months)
Documentary photographs by James Ravilious for the Beaford Archive © Beaford Arts

Reflections on the project:
The oral history strand of the ‘Hidden Histories’ project links oral testimony to selected photographs of James Ravilious with the intention of describing life in rural North Devon between the 1970s and the late 1980s. Research participants are people photographed by Ravilious, and other key figures in the life of North Devon rural communities during these years. The oral history interviews have been conducted by a range of interested parties, including people from the communities featured in the photographs.

The oral history phase of the project will finish in May 2019 with an exhibition of Ravilious’ photographs linked to selections from the oral history interviews.

The recordings and transcripts will be stored at the Beaford Archive.
www.beaford.org

Contact details
Address:
Crown Yealm House, Pathfields Business Park,
South Molton, Devon
EX36 3LH

South Molton EX36 3LH
Email: malcolm@beaford-arts.com


Alessandro Portelli. Reflecting on a Life in Progress and the Stories of Oral History (Newcastle)

 

Launch of the Oral History Collective and Unit @ Newcastle

Wednesday 10 January, 5.30 pm
Curtis Auditorium, Herschel Building,
Newcastle University.

Professor Alessandro Portelli, Professor of American Literature
Sapienza, University of Rome

Alessandro Portelli has played a leading role in transforming oral history. Through a number of key studies, he has promoted an appreciation of oral history as a literary genre that throws light on the significance of subjectivity in history. By interpreting the themes and structures of eyewitness testimony, Portelli has consistently demonstrated new ways of understanding memory.

In this lecture Portelli reflects on his work to date, illustrating his intellectual journey with reference to the stories of the personal, and historical, victories and defeats that have inspired his critical contribution.

Public Lecture
All welcome.
Admission free.

For more information: graham.smith@newcastle.ac.uk

Click here for the event poster. 

The Curtis auditorium is in the Herschel Building, just across the road from the Haymarket metro station and no. 17 on the campus map:
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/media/wwwnclacuk/abouttheuniversity/files/campus-map.pdf