North West Region Annual Report – 2013

Greater Manchester

Rosalyn Livshin

The OHS and the British Library training course on the Introduction to Oral History, was held again in the North West at the Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre at the University of Manchester, which is 5 minutes from Manchester’s Piccadilly station. The Centre’s Oral History Project on ‘Yemeni Roots, Salford Lives’, funded by the HLF to collect life story interviews and documentation on the Yemeni community in Eccles, was completed in December 2012. 22 life story interviews were recorded and the project also involved arts reminiscence and youth projects utilising other methodologies. The recordings are archived at the Centre. A community website, www.yca-manchester.org.uk, contains text and sound extracts from the interviews collected.

The Centre is also participating in an interdisciplinary project between the University of Manchester’s department of Archaeology, the Manchester Museum, the Whitworth Art Gallery, and the Friends of Whitworth Park looking at the history and development of Whitworth Park, which was opened in 1890. The project’s many outputs include archival research, archaeological digs, poetry workshops for school children, as well as oral histories. The archaeological digs have been taking place and Vox Pox interviews have been recorded during park Open Days, giving a glimpse of the many personal memories that local people have of this space. The Oral History element of the Project is yet to start but preparatory work has taken place with a template being devised, using the innovative mind mapping tool; the KETSO, © University of Manchester, which helped to identify the most important themes. Of particular interest to the Centre will be how the changing communities in the vicinity have been reflected in the park. Anyone with memories of the Park should contact ruth.colton@manchester.ac.uk. And the project’s blog at: whitworthparklife.wordpress.com/ will show how the project is progressing.

Oral History Training Sessions were held with the Working Class Movement Library in Salford which has launched an Oral History Project ‘Invisible Histories’, recording the memories of people who worked at three Salford workplaces. The three workplaces were chosen as a microcosm of the diverse range of industry once based in Salford. They are Agecroft Colliery, which closed in 1991, Ward and Goldstone’s engineering factory, at one time Salford’s largest industrial employer, which closed in 1986 and Richard Haworth’s mill, which existed for around a century from the 1870s on Ordsall Lane, near what is now Salford Quays. To date the project has conducted 22 interviews with people who worked at these three sites.

In an effort to bring these memories to a wider audience, the Working Class Movement Library has been working in association with teachers and Year 9 students at Buile Hill Visual Arts College to produce a podcast, linking people’s actual words with music and song. They will also contribute to an exhibition and work with a musician and creative practitioner to produce a Radio Ballad, based on the memories and stories that have been collected. When the Radio Ballad is complete, it will be added to the project website http://InvisibleHistoriesProject.wordpress.com) and disseminated as widely as possible. The project website includes the full interviews, summaries or transcripts for the interviews and themes will be added with accompanying interview extracts.
Participating in the Oral History Training was also a member of the Blackden Trust, which is aiming to create an archive of documents, photographs, oral histories and artefacts detailing the history of the ancient area of Blackden within the village of Goostrey in the depths of Cheshire. With the help of a group of volunteers, the trust organises events and workshops and hopes to uncover the stories, memories and half-forgotten lore associated with the area.

People