Seeking British Korean War veterans for film project

 

UK CHARITY SEEKS OUT BRITISH KOREAN WAR VETERANS FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FILM PROJECT

The Legasee Educational Trust Links up with the Korean War Legacy Foundation for Educational Project Covering Three Continents.

The Legasee Educational Trust is looking for Korean War Veterans from across the UK to come forward and share their experiences of the often forgotten conflict for a major new oral history project that will see British contributors added to the Korean War Legacy Foundations international digital memorial archive.

The New York-based Korean War Legacy Foundation, Inc. (KWLF) has sponsored the Legasee Educational Trust to film the oral accounts of British Korean War Veterans for their digital memorial, which hosts around 800 in-depth interviews with Korean War vets and 6,000 historical artefacts related to the conflict (http://kwvdm.org).

The British Veteransoral histories will complement the existing archive, which is used for educational projects including providing digital teaching materials, hosting annual teacher conferences and running educational trips to Korea.

The project follows the success last year of the Legasee Educational Trusts Korea The Forgotten War project, which collected the personal testimonies of 50 veterans from the North West of England for a digital archive that formed an invaluable insight into first-hand experiences of the war. This was accompanied by a local schools project, teaching resources and an exhibition at the Tameside Local Studies and Archive Centre.

Jongwoo Han, President of the Korean War Legacy Foundation said: We are very excited at the prospect of receiving the stories of Korean War Veterans from Great Britain, the second largest force to fight in the Korean War. The stories will be a great boost to our archive and help to bring together educators and teachers from three countries the Republic of Korea, the UK and the USA.

Legasee Trustee Martin Bisiker said: We are extremely keen to record the personal stories of British veterans who were involved in a war that is too often forgotten for this very special project. We know there must be lots of people out there with stories to tell and we are very keen to hear from them. If you know of anyone who was involved in the conflict then please encourage them to step forward so their voices can be heard for future generations across the world to discover and learn from.

If you know of anybody who served in the Korean War and has a story to tell, please contact the Legasee Educational Trust at martin@legasee.org.uk. Filming is expected to commence from September 2017.

About Legasee Educational Trust:

Legasee Educational Trust is a charity set up to record the experiences and observations of all veterans of conflict from WWII until present day. To create the largest online film archive of this aspect of our social history that can be used for education, learning and better understanding for todays generation and many generations to come. Legasees film archive is well regarded and used to support

Legasee Educational Trust is a Registered Charity No.1145354

 

This guide is for people who record oral history interviews, and organisations and individuals who keep collections of oral history recordings in the four nations of the United Kingdom. England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland comprise the UK and amongst them have three legal systems. However so far as the law is referred to in this document it is safe to assume that all come within the wider context of UK and European law. The Oral History Society promotes the use of oral history techniques to record the memories of those whose life stories would otherwise be lost to future generations, and encourages researchers and teachers to make use of oral history in their work.

It is essential that interviewees should have confidence and trust in interviewers, and that recordings should be available for research and other use within a legal and ethical framework which protects the interests of interviewees. The following information and guidelines are aimed at ensuring that these objectives are achieved.

Anyone involved with the creation and preservation of oral history interviews should take steps to safeguard their reputation for trustworthiness. This means ensuring that what they do is within the various UK and European laws that apply to oral history and that they have not been acting illegally. Oral historians generally speaking have a good reputation in this respect. This guidance is therefore offered as reassurance and advice to both interviewers and interviewees.

The Oral History Society believes that, while oral history work must comply with the law, legal requirements alone do not provide an adequate framework for good practice. No UK law was designed specifically to regulate oral history work; in fact no law even mentions it. Beyond legal considerations we have long held the view that oral historians should abide by a voluntary set of ethical guidelines.

For these reasons this guide covers responsibilities and obligations beyond legal requirements. Members of the Oral History Society, including those who are custodians, archivists and librarians, have agreed to abide by these guidelines.

The guidance reflects the workflow of a typical oral history interview. Much of the legal and technical detail is available not within the main guidance text but via hypertext links so that the key steps and terms can be understood and followed. There are also links to sample documents and resources.